LPS Is...

Lincoln Public Schools: In One Word

Continuing with our one word that describes Lincoln Public Schools — in December our community said that LPS is… Caring.

Continuing with our one word that describes Lincoln Public Schools – in December our community said that LPS is…Caring.

Kindness can be contagious, and Lincoln Public Schools is proof of just that, with stories of students and staff providing inspiration throughout our elementary, middle and high schools.

Many random acts of kindness fill our hallways throughout the year and especially around the holidays. This time of year many ask themselves what can they be doing to lend a helping hand to their neighbors and their community – and at Lincoln Public Schools that is equally true. As the days grow shorter and the cold air stings, our students and staff provide their own light and warmth with coat and food drives, penny and blood drives, writing letters, buying gifts for children in need, putting in volunteer hours.

With lessons of gratitude and giving woven into the fabric of LPS, our educators have created a culture of kindness throughout our classrooms.

In December, our stories will reflect why LPS is … Caring.

This past summer we posed a question to our community, our families, our staff and our students – describe Lincoln Public Schools in one, single word. Each month we will reveal a new word that describes LPS.

Previous Months

September: LPS is HOPE
October: LPS is GROWING
November: LPS is INCLUSIVE
December: LPS is CARING

  • LNE Junior ROTC honors veterans with wreaths
  • City honors Lincoln Public Schools for recycling efforts

    Lincoln Public Schools has been recycling since 1998 and in that time has diverted more than 21 million pounds of material from the landfill. On Thursday, LPS added another impressive number to its recycling resume: 50, which is the number of schools the City of Lincoln honored through its Recycle Lincoln Leadership Recognition Program.

  • Therapy dogs bring joy, unconditional love to schools

    Shug is one of two therapy dogs at Randolph Elementary School. Shug is actually short for Sugar Bear - which makes sense, because the three-year old English Cream Golden Retriever is very sweet. Shug is one of 29 therapy dogs roaming the hallways and classrooms of Lincoln Public Schools, trading their affection and attention for belly rubs and a good scratch behind the ears.

  • Elliott Elementary builds ?houses,? creates a home

    ?A house does not make a home,? the saying goes. Students and staff at Elliott Elementary School would disagree. This year, the school in central Lincoln is building community and a more positive environment through the creation of ?houses.? Once a month, students split up into their assigned mixed-grade groups - their houses - and participate in activities with varying themes.

  • Rousseau honored as Blue Ribbon School

    Rousseau Elementary School has been named a 2018 Blue Ribbon School by the U.S. Department of Education, one of only four in Nebraska and 349 nationwide.

  • Learning Lunch: Lincoln Public Schools welcomes all

    Lincoln Public Schools opens its doors to embrace families and students from around the world through the Welcome Center, located inside Park Middle School in south central Lincoln. That was the topic for the November Learning Lunch Tuesday, featuring Laura Salem, supervisor of the LPS English Language Learner program; Kelley Veselinov, English Language Learner assessment specialist; and Magdalena Benton, a bilingual liaison for LPS who walked through those Welcome Center doors years ago.

  • School resource officers focused on building positive culture at middle schools

    Lincoln Police Officer Kathryn Meade had her first day of school on Thursday. She even had her husband take the customary first-day-of-school photo in front of their house. Meade is one of six new school resource officers who had their first day with Lincoln Public Schools on Thursday. Each of them will split his or her time between two of the 12 LPS middle schools.

  • A friendship forged through a love of flags

    Before Lane Elsberry steps inside Randolph Elementary School to start his day, the first-grader makes an important stop on the route from his parents? car to the front door. He stops to help Stan Minchow, the school?s assistant custodial supervisor, raise the American and Nebraska flags outside the school?s 37th Street entrance.

  • Bubba's Closet opens its doors to hundreds

    Hundreds of elementary school students can bundle up and stay a little warmer this winter, thanks to Bubba?s Closet.