LPS Mariachi Band 2019 Spring Tour

2019 LPS Mariachi Spring Tour

¡Bienvenidos!

New this year to Lincoln Public Schools is Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella. This group of musicians is comprised of students in grades eight through 12 from all over Lincoln. During the school year, they learn and perform the traditional music of mariachis.

Today, March 29, the group is traveling through Lincoln treating different schools to its unique sound. Today’s schedule is: 

  • 8:15 a.m. at Kooser Elementary School
  • 10:45 a.m. at Southeast High School
  • 1 p.m. at Huntington Elementary School
  • 2:15 p.m. at Scott Middle School

Check back often as we will be posting photos, videos and quotes as we follow the band on its tour.

A photo of the LPS Los Mariachis de la Ciudad Estrella Moños
Moños or the wide bow ties are traditional neckwear for mariachis. These moños were custom made for the LPS Los Mariachis de la Ciudad Estrella and feature the Nebraska State Capitol building. The group chose the colors red and goldenrod.
Group shot with Scott principal Marco Pedroza

Adios! Thanks to everyone for following along today. If you want to watch these amazing young musicians in person, be sure to come to the LPS Learning Lunch at noon, Tuesday, May 14 at LPS District Office! They’re also playing May 20 with the Lincoln Community Concert Band, at 7 p.m. at the Kimball Recital on the UNL campus.

Also, a special thank you to the Foundation for Lincoln Public Schools. This mariachi group is made possible through its generous support.

2:50 p.m.
Take a Bow!
That's a wrap! Thank you to everybody that came to watch today. It was our pleasure to entertain you and introduce you to mariachi music. We hope to see some of you in our group next year!

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2:50 p.m.
Reaction!
"It was very interesting"

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Did You Know?
Professional mariachi bands typically incorporate the following instruments: violin, guitarrón mexicano, guitarra de golpe, Mexican vihuela, guitar, trumpet, flute and accordian.
Reaction!
"I really liked this music"

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Reaction!
"I really liked it!"

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El Rey at Scott
Meet a Mariachi
Mana is an 8th grader at Goodrich

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2:31 p.m.
Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella at Scott Middle School
2:31 p.m.
Meet a Mariachi
Alison, a freshman at Southwest High School, plays the violin

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2:23 p.m.
Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella at Scott
2:23 p.m.
Meet a Mariachi
Noe, a junior at Lincoln High, plays the guitar

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Meet a Mariachi
Brandon, a junior at Lincoln High, plays the viola

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2:22 p.m.
Our last performance of the day, for the Stars of Scott Middle School
2:22 p.m.
Did You Know?
The first student Mariachi group began in 1961 at the University of California, Los Angeles. This prompted the creation of other student organizations in other parts of California and then in Texas, where the first mariachi festival was held in 1979. Since then, a strong synergy has developed between academic programs and mariachi festivals, which feature students and offer mariachi classes and workshops.
Meet a Mariachi
Azariah, an 8th grader at Goodrich Middle School, plays the violin

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2:00 p.m.
Only one stop left — Scott Middle School
2:00 p.m.
Video Reaction
Huntington fifth grade students Marco and Mia say what they liked about Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella

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Meet a Mariachi
Morgan, a sophomore at Lincoln High, plays the trumpet

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1:50 p.m.
Thank You for letting us play for you, Huntington
1:50 p.m.
Did You Know?
Mariachi is a musical genre that originated in Mexico in the 19th century. It is native to the western region of Mexico, extending as far north as Sinaloa and Durango and as far south as Guerrero.
Meet a Mariachi
Emilie, a junior at Lincoln High, plays the guitar

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Gallery
Keep an eye here through the day for exciting tour happenings but we have even more in our gallery!

View the Gallery
Meet a Mariachi
Ian, a Schoo Middle School 8th grader, plays the guitarrón

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1:14 p.m.
Eagle Eye View
Huntington Eagles take a break from their studies to be entertained by Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella
1:14 p.m.
1:08 p.m.
We're at Huntington
The first song title always gets a chuckle from audiences and Huntington was no different. The Avacados
1:08 p.m.
Did You Know?
Mariachis are typically hired to perform at baptisms, weddings, patriotic holidays, funerals and serenatas (serenades).
Meet a Mariachi
Pati, a Lincoln East Junior, plays the Violin

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12:35 p.m.
Huntington Elementary — We're coming your way next!
12:35 p.m.
12:15 p.m.
Mariachi gotta eat!
We're taking a short break to refuel and then we'll be on the road again
12:15 p.m.
You've been a great crowd! Good Knight!
A standing ovation at Southeast High School! Thank you, Knights, for being such an amazing audience!
Ah, the life of a therapy dog
The rest of the crowd at Southeast High School was much more excited about the show than Ned the therapy dog
Meet a Mariachi
Cindy, a Lincoln High School Junior, is a vocalist

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11:30 a.m.
A murmur of excitement from the crowd at Southeast High School as the band announces the next song, “Despacito,” probably thinking it was the version by Justin Bieber. They weren’t disappointed, though - raucous applause for this version, too.
11:30 a.m.
10:58 a.m.
We're Live!
See us perform from Southeast High School

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10:58 a.m.
Did You Know?
From the beginning, mariachi music was dance music. The traditional dance technique associated with it is the zapateado. When dancing the zapateado, which originated in Spain, the performers drive the heels of their boots into the dance floor, pounding out swift, often syncopated rhythms that complement the musical instruments.
Meet a Mariachi
Josue, a Lincoln High School Senior, plays the vihuela

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10:35 a.m.
Warming up at Southeast
We're on the stage getting ready to perform at Lincoln Southeast High School!
10:35 a.m.
Meet a Mariachi
Eli, a Lincoln Southwest Freshman, plays the Viola

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9:45 a.m.
Next Stop: Southeast High School
9:45 a.m.
Meet a Mariachi
Marcus, a Lincoln High Freshman, plays the Violin

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9:00 a.m.
Video Reaction
Kooser fifth grade students Natalie and Cheyenne say what they liked about Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella

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9:00 a.m.
Gallery
Keep an eye here through the day for exciting tour happenings but we have even more in our gallery!

View the Gallery
Did You Know?
Linguists believe the word "mariachi" may have come from one or more of the following sources: a word for a certain tree that exists in Cocula, Jalisco, Mexico; a word for a wooden dance platform made from the same tree; or a word for musical groups that the Coca Indians have always had in their language.
8:50 a.m.
Video: El Rey
8:50 a.m.
Overheard at Kooser
“Whoa, that’s a big guitar!”

Talking about the guittarón played by band member Ian Burbach, an 8th-grader at Schoo Middle School.
8:34 a.m.
Fifth graders at Kooser listen to Los Mariachis de la Ciudad Estrella
8:34 a.m.
8:24 a.m.
Los Aguacates
Los Aguacates = The Avadados — Yum!
8:24 a.m.
8:15 a.m.
We're at Kooser Elementary!
8:15 a.m.
7:23 a.m.
Mariachi, Assemble!
The general consensus among band members: "Tired."

"You'll wake up soon enough," says band director and Lincoln High music teacher Brett Noser.
7:23 a.m.
7:03 a.m.
Director Noser ready for an exciting day
The director of Los Mariachis de las Ciudad Estrella is Brett Noser. Watch this video of him introducing the tour.
7:03 a.m.